Pharmacists are some of the most accessible and trusted healthcare professionals to the public. Beyond filling and dispensing of medications, pharmacists provide a wide array of prevention and wellness services to help improve health outcomes. New collaborative care models recognize pharmacists as important contributors to the patient’s healthcare team. Pharmacists are the medication experts.

Including pharmacists in team-based care increases patient awareness of the importance of medication adherence and further encourages and supports behavior change and self-management of many chronic illnesses and diseases. Pharmacists can provide many services to patients that coordinate with the care they’re receiving for their healthcare providers. Services such as immunizations, comprehensive medication management, collaborative drug therapy management and patient education and counseling are just a few of the services pharmacists provide to help their patients achieve optimal health outcomes. By understanding and maximizing the role of pharmacists, opportunities exist to better use their knowledge and skills to improve the health of our communities.

To learn more about how pharmacists can improve our nation’s health please click here.

 

Additional Information and Resources

Nebraska Community Pharmacy Demographics 2015: Assessment of Nebraska Pharmacists and Corporate Employers about Medication Therapy Management and Chronic Disease Management

In 2015, the Nebraska Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Program in partnership with Creighton University Center for Health Services Research and Patient Safety conducted a survey to determine the readiness of Nebraska pharmacists in providing clinically-related services, including Medication Therapy Management.

The services evaluated through this study focused on patient access to chronic disease management and other care services. Findings from the study offered a promising outlook on the delivery of medication therapy management and other patient care services. Findings from this study include:

• Approximately two-thirds of all pharmacists have provided medication therapy management services in the past 12 months.

• One fourth of pharmacists have received formal training in medication therapy management.

• Nearly all medication therapy management services are delivered via face-to-face/in-person or by telephone.

To download a copy of the Nebraska Community Pharmacy Demographic Survey please click the links below.

NE Community Pharmacy Demographics 2015 Brochure
Nebraska Community Pharmacy Demographics 2015: Assessment of Nebraska Pharmacists and Corporate Employers about Medication Therapy Management and Chronic Disease Management

Nebraska Pharmacists Chronic Disease Management and Self-Care Project

The Nebraska Pharmacists Chronic Disease Management and Self-Care Project focuses on increasing the engagement, reach, and adoption of interventions that support the provision of medication-/self-management for adults with high blood pressure and diabetes. Since 2015, the Nebraska Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Program has supported interested pharmacies in developing sustainable interventions to address chronic diseases such as high blood pressure and diabetes.

To download a copy of the Implementation and Outcomes of Nebraska Pharmacists Chronic Disease, Prevention and Management Control Program 2016 please click here

Nebraska Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Pharmacy Task Force

The Nebraska Chronic Disease Prevention and Control Pharmacy Task Force was created to discuss strategies for implementing a network of pharmacists interested in working together to expand opportunities for pharmacists to care for patients and develop compensation models for doing so.

Kimberly Galt, PharmD, PhD, FNAP, FASHP, will be the key note speaker. Dr. Galt has been integral in the development and management of pharmacy primary care and clinical pharmacy ambulatory care practice sites in private medical clinics and the Veterans Affairs. Dr. Galt is currently consulting with the state of Nebraska on developing case studies of pharmacy practice models that improve patients’ chronic disease health outcomes utilizing self-care improvement strategies and community referral models with medical providers and other health care providers.

The objectives of this guide are to provide the following information:

• Basic definitions for medication therapy management, comprehensive medication management, and collaborative drug therapy management.

• A description of the role of the pharmacist in team-based health care.

• Evidence to support maximizing pharmacists’ engagement in team-based health care.

• An overview of pharmacist scope of practice policies at the federal and state levels.

• A description of how chronic diseases are addressed in community pharmacies.

• Examples of medication therapy management from state health departments.

• Strategies for working with pharmacists.

https://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/programs/spha/docs/Pharmacist_Guide.pdf

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention recognizes the contribution that community pharmacists can make to improve population health. CDC developed this publication, Using the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process to Manage High Blood Pressure: A Resource Guide for Pharmacists, as a call to action to use the Pharmacists’ Patient Care Process2 as a way to Introduction 2 prevent and manage high blood pressure through team-based care, with the goal of reducing heart disease and stroke in the United States. It compiles information about current resources and emerging practices, as well as tools and examples that pharmacists can use to help them improve health outcomes associated with cardiovascular disease.

https://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/pubs/docs/pharmacist-resource-guide.pdf

https://www.scribd.com/document/353710091/NE-Community-Pharmacy-Demographic-2015-Report

https://www.scribd.com/document/353710126/NE-Community-Pharmacy-Demographics-2015-Brochure

A formal agreement in which a licensed provider makes a diagnosis, supervises patient care, and refers patients to a pharmacist under a protocol that allows the pharmacist to perform specific patient care functions.

https://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/pubs/docs/translational_tools_pharmacists.pdf

A formal agreement in which a licensed provider makes a diagnosis, supervises patient care, and refers the patient to a pharmacist under a protocol that allows the pharmacist to perform specific patient care functions.

https://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/pubs/docs/Translational_Tools_Providers.pdf

The objectives of this guide are to provide the following information:

• Basic definitions for medication therapy management, comprehensive medication management, and collaborative drug therapy management.

• A description of the role of the pharmacist in team-based health care.

• Evidence to support maximizing pharmacists’ engagement in team-based health care.

• An overview of pharmacist scope of practice policies at the federal and state levels.

• A description of how chronic diseases are addressed in community pharmacies.

• Examples of medication therapy management from state health departments.

• Strategies for working with pharmacists.

https://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/programs/spha/docs/pharmacist_guide.pdf

The expanded role of 21st century pharmacists will position them to have greater impact in the shifting landscape of health care and public health. Beyond the dispensing of medications, pharmacists also provide a spectrum of prevention services to help improve health outcomes. In the United States, people with chronic conditions account for 91% of all prescriptions filled.  By 2020, it is estimated that 157 million Americans will have at least 1 chronic non-infectious or infectious medical condition. By understanding and maximizing the role of pharmacists, opportunities exist to better use their knowledge and skills to improve our nation’s health.

New collaborative care models identify pharmacists as important contributors to the healthcare team. Enhanced training equips pharmacists with the necessary skills to provide a variety of preventive care and wellness services–increasing access to care for patients. For public health, incorporating pharmacists in team-based care increases patient awareness of the importance of medication adherence and further encourages and supports behavior change and self-management of many chronic illnesses and diseases.

Join us for this session of Public Health Grand Rounds as our speakers illustrate the impact of including pharmacists in team-based care, share tools that CDC has developed to facilitate incorporating pharmacists in public health initiatives, and provide examples of how pharmacists are working in healthcare settings to prevent and manage diseases.

https://www.cdc.gov/cdcgrandrounds/pdf/gr-pharmacists-10-21-2014.pdf

This online resource, Working Together to Manage Diabetes: A Guide for Pharmacy, Podiatry, Optometry, and Dentistry, shows how practitioners in the four disciplines presented here—pharmacy, podiatry, optometry, and dentistry—can work collaboratively with each other, as well as with all other members of the health care team, such as primary health care providers, physician assistants, nurse educators, and community health workers to treat people with diabetes (or in some cases even prevent type 2 diabetes).

https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/ndep/pdfs/ppod-guide.pdf

In this emerging practice document, we examine the role of pharmacists in chronic disease management and highlight examples from three 1305 grantees: Colorado, Iowa, and Ohio. We focus specifically on two activities involving the use of pharmacists: medication therapy management (MTM) and team-based care. These strategies primarily fall within domains 3 (health care system interventions) and 4 (community programs linked to clinical services) of the four domains for coordinating chronic disease prevention. See Exhibit 1 for the relevant 1305 strategies and short-term performance measures.

https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pdfs/programs/stateandlocal/emerging_practices-work_with_pharmacists.pdf

Too many people with diabetes are not getting annual foot, eye, and oral exams, or managing their medications. You have the power to change that. The enhanced Working Together to Manage Diabetes Toolkit empowers pharmacists, podiatrists, optometrists, dentists, and other providers to deliver more integrated health care for patients with diabetes. When you work in tandem with other health care providers, you become even more effective at recognizing the early danger signs of diabetes, decreasing the risk for complications, and managing medication therapy.

https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/ndep/pdfs/ndep_ppod_flyer_print_v6_release_508.pdf